U.S. pushes supply chain action at in-person G20

Wrapping up what was the first in-person G20 since the pandemic began, U.S. President Joe Biden in Rome on Sunday told reporters he and 16 other world leaders on discussed action to make supply chains more resilient in the face of any future health crises, as well as climate change and even planned attacks.

Supply chain problems have emerged as the global economy has pulled out of a pandemic-induced recession and threaten to slow recovery. They have already stoked inflation.

"We have to take action now, together with our partners in the private sector, to reduce the backlogs that we’re facing. And then, we have to prevent this from happening again in the future."

The G20 meeting drew criticism for not taking enough political action to make good on climate promises. Biden blasted China and Russia for the inaction on climate change.

“With regard to the disappointment, the disappointment relates to the fact that Russia, but China basically didn't show up in terms of any commitments to deal with climate change.”

Separately, Biden said Britain, Germany and France “came together” and on a shared belief that diplomacy is the “best way to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon" and discussed ways to get back to the negotiating table.

Biden also said that the United States will "respond" to actions Iran has taken against Washington's interests, including drone strikes.

Biden will now head to the U.N. COP26 climate talks in Glasgow, Scotland, and join other world leaders to discuss ways to address some of the world’s most pressing environmental issues.

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