The Twitter campaign for Afghan women's clothing

Afghan women around the world are posting photos online dressed in bright and vibrant traditional garments - with captions like “This Is Afghanistan.”

The campaign is in response to footage of women inside Afghanistan dressed in black all-enveloping niqabs and gowns.

They were apparently demonstrating in support of the country's new Taliban rulers at Kabul University.

Though many women said they believed the purported protest was staged.

And that several people dressed in the head-to-toe black burqa gowns were men.

The online campaign against this has been run by hashtags like #DoNotTouchMyClothes and #AfghanistanCulture

It gained momentum after Afghan historian Bahar Jalali, who is based in the U.S., tweeted criticizing the black garments worn by the demonstrators.

"No woman has ever dressed like this in the history of Afghanistan. This is utterly foreign and alien to Afghan culture," she said.

Jalali then posted a photograph of herself in a green dress with the caption, "This is Afghan culture," and urged others to post too.

Dozens of women did.

When the Taliban was in power two decades ago, women had to cover themselves from head to toe.

While the new Taliban regime has promised to allow women more freedoms, there have been reports of women being barred from going to work, and some being beaten in recent weeks for protesting Taliban rule.

Universities have installed curtains inside classrooms to segregate men and women.

Women across Afghanistan have staged several protests, demanding that the rights they won over the last two decades be preserved.

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