Tracking pink river dolphins may answer questions

Satellite technology tracks

rare pink river dolphins

Location: Rio Ichilo, Bolivia

Scientists and fisherman hope

to learn more about the species

DIRECTOR OF FAUNAGUA PAUL VAN DAMME, SAYING:

"The fishermen hunted the dolphins to use them as bait for fishing. Now we are raising their awareness and including them as researchers and scientists who monitor the dolphins through cell phones. With them we have developed an application to monitor bufeo populations in the rivers."

Tracking data will tell us more

about the dolphin's life

like what they eat, their migration pattern

and the threats they face

HEAD OF WILDLIFE IN WORLD WILDLIFE FUND IN BOLIVIA, LILA SAINZ, SAYING:

"Dolphins are indicators of the quality of an aquatic ecosystems and its habitat. Everything that affects dolphins affects the humans that use those resources and it inhabits the surrounding marine ecosystems. So, if dolphins are doing well, people are doing well."

Deforestation, dams, and forest fires

threaten the Amazon ecosystem

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