Top toys chosen at the Nuremberg Toy Fair

The winners of this year's prestigious Toy Awards, which take place at the Nuremberg Toy Fair (January 29- February 4), have been announced. 

The Nuremberg Toy Fair is one of the world's leading events of its kind, it attracts over 76,000 visitors per year and helps establish the big trends in play over the following 11 months. The prestigious Toy Awards honor items across the following categories: Baby & Infant (0-2), Pre-school, School kids, Teenager & Family and techy toys in Toys 3.0.

This year's winners of this year's Toy Awards, as chosen by a panel of experts,  are as follows:

Baby & Infant (0-2 years)

Tobbles Neo by Fat Brain Toy Co.
This fun toy features six bright cups of different colors that can be arranged by children in a tower shape. For more information see: http://www.fatbraintoyco.com/

Pre-school (3-5 years)          

Shadow Magic
by Habermaaß GmbH
This magical-themed guessing game features witches, troll and elves. The fantasy creatures dance around a pretend campfire, then players have to remember which creatures were involved in order to gain points.
For more information see: www.haba.de

School Kids (6-10 years)

Bumm Bumm Ballon by Schmidt Spiele GmbH
This toy involves a plastic frame, several pins and the joy of bursting balloons. Children inflate the balloon within the frame and then gently push plastic "pins" towards its surface on the role of a die, how many pins can be pushed against the balloon's surface and who will break it?
For more information see: www.schmidtspiele.de  

Teenager and Family

SIKU Racing by Siku
These speedy cars are not fixed to the road by tracks, but rather can be freely steered around a track staked out with tape. The cars have four different speeds adjustable for the drivers level of expertise.
For more information see: www.siku.de

Toys 3.0 

RoboMe by SABLON 
In this high-tech toy category, the iPhone / iPod-enabled RoboMe was crowned the winner. Using an iPhone or iPod the owner of the toy can give the RoboMe its own voice, appearance and even personality. The robot uses speech recognition technology to learn names and sentences over time and can even be controlled remotely controlled via a secondary iOS device.
For more information see: www.sablon.com