Can’t get to hospitals for Covid-19 jab? Health D-G says mobile unit will go out instead

Ashman Adam
·2-min read
A mobile unit will be sent to administer the Covid-19 vaccine to people who are unable to physically visit designated hospitals. — Reuters file pic
A mobile unit will be sent to administer the Covid-19 vaccine to people who are unable to physically visit designated hospitals. — Reuters file pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 18 — A mobile unit will be sent to administer the Covid-19 vaccine to people who are unable to physically visit designated hospitals when it is their turn, Tan Sri Dr Noor Hisham Abdullah said today.

The Health director-general said the mobile vaccination unit was formed in consideration of people like the elderly who are bedridden and living in old folks’ homes, as well as those who live in rural and remote areas.

“Part of the vaccination programme is the mobilisation of this vaccination unit. We will do our research and identify those locations that this unit will need to visit.

“What is important is that registration is done and the situation of the individual who cannot head to the hospital is informed, so that we can proceed to the location of the individual to administer the vaccine,” he told reporters in a video conference this evening, answering questions about the government’s national Covid-19 immunisation programme that is scheduled to start as early as next week.

Dr Noor Hisham said that mobile health units are already in use to reach those in the remote areas, and will be adjusted to be able to administer the vaccine to those in these areas.

“We cannot expect the Orang Asli to come to us at the hospitals. We must go to them. The same applies to the elderly who cannot leave their homes,” he said.

He added that the Ministry of Health will also need to do a clinical assessment on these critical groups. This includes looking into the history and health status of the individuals to see if it is safe for them to be injected with the vaccine or if there is a risk of adverse effects.

“Most important is that we identify if they are suitable to receive the vaccine.

“This is why we need face to face evaluation before we administer the vaccine,” Dr Noor Hisham said.

He further elaborated that they will work with the heads of these Orang Asli communities to help with their vaccination programmes.

“Before this, we worked with the leaders of these communities to help identify Covid-19 cases among them. We will continue with this outreach programme to ensure that they receive the vaccine,” he said.

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