Singapore government uses cringey but hilarious ‘uncle-aunty’ type messages to remind people to save water, energy

·2-min read
Singapore’s Sustainability and Environment Ministry took inspiration from senior Singaporeans for its latest public service announcement. ― Picture via Facebook
Singapore’s Sustainability and Environment Ministry took inspiration from senior Singaporeans for its latest public service announcement. ― Picture via Facebook

KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 8 — You probably woke up this morning to a ‘good morning’ message from a well-meaning uncle or aunty in your family or social circle.

Yes, we are talking about those images along the lines of a happy smiling sun and a positive affirmation that will either make you laugh out loud or hit the mute icon.

Such is the manner in which older non-digital natives use social media.

Recognising the social currency of said greeting style, Singapore’s Sustainability and Environment Ministry came up with a series of eco-friendly reminders to inspire everyone to be mindful of the environment and minimise waste.

In one example, the greeting ‘Selamat pagi (good morning), water is life remember to turn off your tap’ is written across a brightly coloured picture of a cascading waterfall.

For the uninitiated, older men and women in places like Singapore and Malaysia are referred to as uncle and aunty by younger people as a sign of respect despite not being related.

The idea turned out to be a stroke of genius with the public who flooded the comments section with messages that will make any uncle or aunty proud.

Forgoing any formality, the Ministry embraced its humorous side by writing in a tone mimicking those messages.

After all, who better to drive reminders to save the planet than sagely older generations.

“Gd morning take care always. Send to your family and friends... gd things must share. Rmb to be grateful and save our earth daily (sic),” the post read.

Many couldn’t resist chiming in with their version of uncle-aunty vernacular best exemplified by clumsy typos, cringey shorthand and a liberal usage of the phrase ‘blessed day’.

The viral post received 1,400 reactions on Facebook along with 448 comments and 1,300 shares at the time of writing.

Related Articles Visitor to Singapore Botanic Gardens 'bitten 26 times' by otters; such incidents rare, says Gardens Singapore scientists develop 'potentially game-changing' saliva antigen rapid test SBF survey: Singapore firms offering higher pay due to manpower crunch, thus driving up costs

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting