Selena Gomez on the Moment She Realized 'All of These Years of Confusion and Being in Love' Were Worth It

Alyssa Bailey
·2-min read

From ELLE

Selena Gomez has been open about her mental health journey over the last two years and has made it part of her work: the singer launched an impact fund for Rare Beauty this summer, with the goal of raising $100 million over the next 10 years to help people get access to mental health services. Gomez continued her advocacy and transparency by doing an interview with her mom Mandy Teefey for The Newsette in its newsletter today. The two discussed how they've supported each other and the self-care measures they've taken for their minds.

Gomez also addressed how she was able to transform the more painful parts of her journey in the past—including her romantic relationships that ended with The Weeknd, Justin Bieber, and more—into art and self-growth. It's how she realized all the bumps were worth it, she said.

Gomez was asked if releasing her album Rare in January was "easier than those that came before it because of [her] new focus on mental health and being happier."

Gomez responded, "None of what I’m doing now would have stemmed from the mindset I had before. My best stuff is happening now. And then the greatest thing ever in my music was 'Lose You to Love Me' [Gomez's breakup song believed to be about Bieber]… I remember I had a moment where I couldn’t believe it, because the first and second day, the reactions were crazy, and I remember I smiled and I was like, 'That’s why it’s worth it. All of these years of confusion and being in love, and all of this stuff… and it was finally a clean slate.' And it wasn’t even because everyone liked it; it was just a realization of why I went through everything I went through…"

Gomez, who has spoken before about undergoing DBT therapy, addressed how deciding to have a therapist wasn't a taboo thing for her because of the way Teefey raised her.

"Because I was raised by a mom who wasn’t afraid to talk about things, it didn’t seem like a taboo thing for me," Gomez said. "It was like, 'Oh, ok, I definitely know it’s possible to have mental illness,' so I was much younger when I started therapy...and it was great, but I was still figuring it out. I think it takes a special person for you to match up with, but like my mom said, we do have all of these other free resources because many people can’t afford traditional therapy. That’s why I’ve always had dreams of having centers like Planned Parenthood, but just dedicated to mental health. I believe mental health care should be accessible to everyone."

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