‘Resident Evil’ Canceled After One Season at Netflix

·2-min read

The live-action “Resident Evil” series at Netflix has been canceled after just one season.

The eight-episode first season premiered on Netflix July 14. The show was originally ordered to series at Netflix in 2020.

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The series debuted to a mixed critical response, registering just a 55% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes coupled with a 27% audience approval rating. Per the weekly Netflix Top 10 rankings that the streamer issues, “Resident Evil” was streamed for over 72 million hours the week it debuted, making it the number two program of the week behind only “Stranger Things” Season 4. It dropped to number three in its second week and fell out of the top 10 by week 3.

Based on the Capcom video game franchise of the same name, the show followed Jade Wesker’s (Ella Balinska) fight for survival in a world overrun by blood-thirsty infected and mind-shattering creatures. In this absolute carnage, Jade is haunted by her past in New Raccoon City, by her father Albert’s (Lance Reddick) chilling connections to the sinister Umbrella Corporation but mostly by what happened to her sister, Billie (Siena Agudong).

Additional cast members included: Tamara Smart, Adeline Rudolph, Paola Nuñez, Ahad Raza Mir, Connor Gosatti and Turlough Convery.

Andrew Dabb developed the series for television and served as executive producer and showrunner as well. Mary Leah Sutton was a writer and executive producer on the show. Robert Kulzer and Oliver Berben of Constantin Film also executive produced.

The first “Resident Evil” game was released in 1996. Since then, the game and the multiple new entries in the franchise have sold over 100 million copies worldwide. In addition, the film franchise has grossed over $1.2 billion worldwide. There are also “Resident Evil” animated films, comic books, novels, and theme park attractions.

Deadline first reported the cancellation.

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