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Rep. Jamie Raskin Calls For Hearing On 'Influence Peddling' By Jared Kushner

WASHINGTON ― Democrats on the House oversight committee want Chair James Comer (R-Ky.) to hold a hearing on former President Donald Trump’s son-in-law.

Reps. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) and Robert Garcia (D-Calif.) urged Comer in a Tuesday letter “to convene a hearing regarding Jared Kushner’s apparent influence peddling and quid pro quo deals involving investments in exchange for official actions and to examine the resulting threats to our national security.”

Comer has led a yearlong investigation and impeachment inquiry related to President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden, who raked in millions from foreign nationals during and after his father’s time as vice president.

Though Comer has claimed that Joe Biden actively participated in his son’s business deals, witnesses have said that the elder Biden wasn’t involved except for the occasional greeting and exchange of pleasantries with his son’s business associates.

Raskin and Garcia pointed out that according to recent reporting by The New York Times, Kushner has been actively pursuing real estate deals with foreign governments, using contacts he made as a senior White House adviser, while Trump runs to retake the presidency.

Comer has previously said that Kushner “crossed the line of ethics” when he secured a massive Saudi investment shortly after leaving the White House, but the Kentucky Republican brushed off Democrats’ suggestion of a hearing.

“Unlike the Bidens, Jared Kushner has a legitimate business and has a career as a business executive that predates Donald Trump’s political career,” Comer said in a statement. “Democrats’ latest letter is part of their playbook to shield President Biden from oversight.”

Comer has claimed that Joe Biden essentially cashed in on his government service by allowing his family members to profit off their famous last name. Raskin has previously highlighted the fact that Trump himself owned businesses that received millions of dollars directly from foreign governments while he was president — seemingly a violation of the Constitution’s ban on U.S. officials receiving foreign payments.

The oversight committee’s investigation of the Bidens has been intensely partisan, but there have been moments of apparent agreement about the problem of “influence peddling” in general. During a hearing last week, Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) said that lawmakers should examine ways to stop former officials from cashing in after serving in government.

“Ms. Porter, I think you are sincere, and I look forward to working with you on that legislation,” Comer said.