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Prince Harry's rift with brother William 'began following heated disagreement over wildlife conservation'

Prince Harry and William have reportedly been at odds for years (PA)
Prince Harry and William have reportedly been at odds for years (PA)

The rift between the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Sussex began due to a heated disagreement over conservation work, it has been reported.

The brothers fell out with each other following a dispute on the best methods to stop poaching and protect endangered species in Africa, The Times reported.

A source told the newspaper: “They are both very passionate about saving protected species but didn’t always share the same view about how to run projects in Africa.

“William believes you should focus on community-led schemes where local people over time feel empowered to protect the land.

“Harry, on the other hand, was more interventionist. He felt that you need a more hands-on approach to ensure wildlife habitats were securely protected to enact change quickly.”

Harry shared details of his relationship with William in his book, Spare (PA)
Harry shared details of his relationship with William in his book, Spare (PA)

The feud between the two brothers has been well reported since Prince Harry left the Firm to start a new life in the US with Meghan and their children in 2020.

The Duke claimed in his 2023 memoir Spare that William had attacked him in an argument over his wife.

But the source told the Times that divisions had been brewing for some years before.

Prince William lost his friend Anton Mzimba, who was killed by gunmen in South Africa’s Kruger national park.

Harry’s approach has relied upon generous investments and is said to have sometimes been heavy-handed and off-putting to local tribes. He has been president of African Parks since 2017.

The Duke is now reported to be considering a documentary about his conservatorship work in Africa.

Comments written in Spare also indicate that he was at odds with William’s approach.

“To allow the coexistence of people and animals, fences are increasingly having to be used to separate the two, and try to keep the peace,” Harry wrote.

“Once a fence is up, you are now managing a parcel of land. Different rules have to apply, whether we like it or not. Under these conditions human intervention in stabilising nature might be required by park managers.”