Prince Harry's memoir to be published in January, titled 'Spare'

FILE PHOTO: State funeral and burial of Queen Elizabeth

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's Prince Harry's memoir will be published on Jan. 10 with the title "Spare" and will tell with "raw unflinching honesty" his journey from "trauma to healing", publisher Penguin Random House said on Thursday.

The book, which was originally due to be published later this year, will be "full of insight, revelation, self-examination, and hard-won wisdom about the eternal power of love over grief", the publisher said.

The title refers to Harry's position as the younger brother of Prince William, who has been heir to the British throne since their father Charles become king last month following the death of Queen Elizabeth. Until William and his wife Kate had their three children, Harry was next in line to his brother in the order of succession, hence the phrase "the spare to the heir".

A photo of Harry looking directly into the camera features on the cover, along with the words "Prince Harry" and "Spare".

Harry and his wife Meghan, who are formally known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, stepped down from royal duties in early 2020 and moved to the United States.

The pair sent shockwaves through the British monarchy in a 2021 interview with Oprah Winfrey when Meghan accused an unnamed member of the royal family of having raised concerns about how dark their son's skin might be and said her life as a royal had left her on the brink of suicide.

Harry has also spoken about being on a "different path" to his brother, although he and his wife appeared with William and Kate after Queen Elizabeth's death last month.

The book will be published in 15 languages, including Spanish, French and Chinese, while the English-language edition will be available in the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, India, South Africa and Canada.

It will be priced at 28 pounds ($32.43) in Britain, the publisher said, and an audio edition, read by the author, will be released.

Harry will support British charities with donations from his proceeds, the publisher said.

($1 = 0.8633 pounds)

(Reporting by Muvija M and Paul Sandle; Editing by Frances Kerry)