Premier League's PPV scheme to be scrapped after internationals - reports

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FILE PHOTO: Premier League - Leeds United v Leicester City
FILE PHOTO: Premier League - Leeds United v Leicester City

LONDON (Reuters) - The Premier League is set to ditch the controversial pay-per-view scheme after November's international window amid strong criticism from fans, British media reported on Thursday.

The Premier League last month agreed a deal with domestic television broadcasters for games outside those in the normal broadcast slots to be shown via pay-per-view.

As per the scheme, those matches not already selected for broadcast in October were available only for purchase via BT Sport Box Office or Sky Sports Box Office and priced at 14.95 pounds ($19.55) per game in the United Kingdom.

The Football Supporters' Association urged the league to reconsider the pricing and some fans opted to donate to a charity as part of a protest against the scheme.

A decision on a new broadcast solution was not taken at a shareholders meeting on Thursday but the report said the league is likely to return to its old broadcasting model, where all matches are televised by one of the broadcast partners.

The meeting was also updated on the Premier League's latest bail-out package offer to the English Football League (EFL) -- 50 million pounds to League One and League Two clubs and a commitment to support any Championship club facing financial strain amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

"The offer guarantees no EFL club need go out of business as a result of the pandemic in the 2020/21 season, and our intention is to play an active role in helping clubs return to financial stability," the Premier League said in a statement https://www.premierleague.com/news/1887901.

The move comes after the government's Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) committee summoned England's soccer chiefs to a meeting next week in a bid to break the deadlock over the rescue package.

($1 = 0.7645 pounds)

(Reporting by Manasi Pathak and Hardik Vyas in Bengaluru, editing by Ed Osmond)