Pokémon Brilliant Diamond And Shining Pearl Glitch Is Renaming Monsters

·2-min read
A screenshot of Mew floating in the air from Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl.
A screenshot of Mew floating in the air from Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl.


THAT’S NOT MY NAME!!!

The latest batch of Pokémon games, Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl, are experiencing a handful of silly glitches. While the duplication glitch is something players are exploiting to their advantage, there’s another glitchy issue players are encountering that is just plain weird: seeing their monsters’ nicknames replaced with something else entirely.

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Twitter user glitchsaur posted a short video of their Gabite evolving to a Garchomp. That’s not out of the ordinary. Pokémon evolve all the time. What’s strange, though, is that the monster’s nickname was changed even before the evolution finished. Originally called “girlboss,” the monster’s name was swapped out for “mike” during its transformation. Oddly, mike didn’t stick, as the girlboss nickname did come back after a brief moment.

This isn’t the only instance of a Pokémon’s moniker getting scrubbed away. Twitch streamer Tony Daddi encountered the same glitch while playing Brilliant Diamond. Having named his Lickitung “Bertha,” Tony chuckled in utter befuddlement at the sight of the Gen 1 Pokémon getting renamed to “Gustavo” during its evolution to Lickilicky. Much like glitchsaur’s girlboss, Gustavo wasn’t Lickilicky’s permanent name, as Tony went into the Pokédex to confirm that the transformed Normal-type monster was, in fact, still nicknamed Bertha. Still, this is a bizarre glitch to come across.

The glitch also does other strange stuff, like swapping out the monikers of un-nicknamed Pokémon with Japanese Hiragana. According to TheGamer, it appears the issue is connected to the Grand Underground, a dungeon of sorts with rare monsters and items, and how the game’s text system comprehends Pokémon names and nicknames. In any case, it doesn’t seem to have any lasting effects.

Read More: The New Pokémon Diamond And Pearl Remakes Are Barebones, But I’m Still Having A Blast

Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl, remakes of the similarly named Pokémon games from 2006, offer some improvements but tend to mostly play it safe. Despite their sameness, my colleague Ethan Gach is still having a good time.


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