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Parks Canada probe finds 'no signs of cougar activity' following February attack claim

Parks Canada had posted an area closure bulletin for Castle Mountain Lookout and Silverton Falls, including the Rockbound Lake area, following the visitor-reported incident. Castle Mountain in Banff National Park is shown in a June 2023 photo.  (Colette Derworiz/The Canadian Press - image credit)
Parks Canada had posted an area closure bulletin for Castle Mountain Lookout and Silverton Falls, including the Rockbound Lake area, following the visitor-reported incident. Castle Mountain in Banff National Park is shown in a June 2023 photo. (Colette Derworiz/The Canadian Press - image credit)

A Parks Canada investigation has determined that no cougar DNA was found in an area of Banff National Park where a person told authorities he'd been attacked last month.

On Feb. 12, one person reported being attacked by a cougar and injured at the Rockbound Lake trailhead, a popular tourist area.

In an email statement to CBC News on Friday, Parks Canada said the area was thoroughly searched following the report, but "no signs of cougar activity" were found.

"Parks Canada has now received the lab-tested DNA results, indicating that cougar DNA was not found on the samples that were collected," the statement reads, adding samples underwent forensic testing to corroborate initial findings.

"Parks Canada's investigation is now closed and the area closure for the Rockbound Lake area including Castle Mountain Lookout and Silverton Falls has been lifted."