Pakatan MP says drinking 'Timah' whisky is like 'drinking Malay women'

·2-min read
The controversy surrounding the award-winning whiskey ‘Timah’ found its way into the Dewan Rakyat today. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
The controversy surrounding the award-winning whiskey ‘Timah’ found its way into the Dewan Rakyat today. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 28 — The controversy surrounding the award-winning whisky “Timah” continues, having found its way into the Dewan Rakyat today, during the debate session on the Trade Descriptions Bill (Amendment) 2021.

While PAS' Tumpat MP Datuk Che Abdullah Mat Nawi (PAS) was debating the Bill touching on the halal aspects which he said was not highlighted in the Bill, he was interjected by Pakatan Harapan's (PH) Tangga Batu MP Rusnah Aluai who asked as to why the image of “Captain Speedy” on the bottle's facade, needs to be wearing a kopiah often synonymous with Muslims.

“When we say that it's confusing, I want to stress again that this Timah brand truly is confusing. It is also included with an image of Captain Speedy donning a kopiah. Isn't there a photo of Captain Speedy wearing a hat?

“Or this Timah brand, can't we call it something else? Mines or The Mines or anything else?” she said, proceeding to claim that the brand is “not something that is good for women”.

On October 18, the PAS Dewan Ulama (DUPP) expressed concern about the use of the name “Timah” as whisky brand.

Calling for a stop to all promotion and sale of the liquor to the public, DUPP information chief Mohd Nor Hamzah said this was to prevent any negative impact on society, especially young people.

Mohd Nor was responding to criticisms linked to the liquor brand being directed at PAS since it is a component party of the federal government.

A Malaysian-made whisky, “Timah” is sold at RM190 per bottle and contains 40 per cent alcohol.

The company previously explained that the name “Timah” was a reference to tin mining in colonial Malaya, while the man depicted on the whisky label is Captain Speedy, who is said to have introduced whisky culture to the country.

The company said it was with this historical backdrop in mind that the name “Timah” was used and that it had not intended to stir any controversy.

The company also explained that any interpretation of the name unrelated to Malaysian tin mining is false.

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