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Ozzy Osbourne says he hopes to perform one last show amid health concerns: 'At best, I've got 10 years left'

Ozzy Osbourne speaks onstage at iHeartRadio ICONS with Ozzy Osbourne: In Celebration of Ordinary Man at iHeartRadio Theater on February 24, 2020 in Burbank, California.
Ozzy Osbourne in 2020.Kevin Winter/Getty Images for iHeartMedia
  • Ozzy Osbourne spoke about his declining health in an interview with Rolling Stone UK.

  • The Black Sabbath singer has Parkinson's disease and recently underwent four surgeries on his spine.

  • He said a tumor was found on his vertebrae during his most recent surgery.

Ozzy Osbourne shared thoughts on his future amid his declining health, revealing that he thinks he's "got ten years left" in a candid interview.

In Rolling Stone UK's latest cover story published Friday, the 74-year-old rocker opened up about his health following his February announcement that he was retiring from touring because of ongoing problems with his spine, which he injured four years ago.

Since then, Osbourne has had four surgeries, the last of which he told the outlet "virtually left me crippled."

"It really knocked me about. The second surgery went drastically wrong," said the "Crazy Train" singer.

"I thought I'd be up and running after the second and third, but with the last one they put a fucking rod in my spine. They found a tumor in one of the vertebrae, so they had to dig all that out too," he said.

He continued: "It's pretty rough, man, and my balance is all fucked up."

Ozzy Osbourne of Black Sabbath performs during the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games Closing Ceremony at Alexander Stadium.
Ozzy Osbourne was born in Birmingham, the host city of this year's Commonwealth Games.Getty/Alex Pantling

According to Rolling Stone UK, Osbourne had a fall in 2019 that dislodged the metal rods that were put into his body after a severe quad bike crash in 2003.

Per the outlet, Osbourne was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease the same year, a progressive nervous-system disorder that causes a gradual loss of nerve cells in the brain and has no known cure. Osbourne shared the news with the public in a January 2020 interview on "Good Morning America," where he said he was diagnosed with the condition in February 2019.

Representatives for Osbourne did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for clarification about when he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease.

The former Black Sabbath frontman said he doesn't "even think about Parkinson's that much," and demonstrated to the reporter by stretching out his arm to show that he does not have the continuous tremors in his arms that most people with the condition do.

However, he went on to say that he "should have been dead way before loads" of his late friends due to his previous alcohol and drug use.

"Why am I the last man standing? I don't understand any of it. Sometimes I look in the mirror and go, 'Why the fuck did you make it?!'" he said. "I'm not boasting about any of it because I should have been dead a thousand times. I've had my stomach pumped God knows how many times."

He said that his wife of 41 years, Sharon Osbourne, disapproves of him using the recreational drug marijuana amid his declining health.

sharon and ozzy osbourne
John Phillips / Getty

"I said to Sharon that I'd smoked a joint recently and she said, 'What are you doing that for! It'll fucking kill you!' I said, 'How long do you want me to fucking live for?!'" he continued.

He added: "At best, I've got ten years left and when you're older, time picks up speed."

As for touring, Osbourne said he hopes to perform again as he never got the "chance to say goodbye or thank you" to his fans since he announced the cancellation of the rescheduled dates from his farewell tour, which began in 2018.

"If I can't continue doing shows on a regular basis, I just want to be well enough to do one show where I can say, 'Hi guys, thanks so much for my life.' That's what I'm working towards, and if I drop down dead at the end of it, I'll die a happy man," he said.

Read the original article on Insider