Orange Is the New Chic in This Parisian Furniture Showroom

·2-min read
Photo credit: Jean Pierre Vaillancourt
Photo credit: Jean Pierre Vaillancourt

Pierre Yovanovitch is on a roll. Just two months after the Paris-based designer revealed his newest venture, a furniture and lighting collection called Pierre Yovanovitch Mobilier, he has unveiled a stylish new showroom in which to flaunt the elegant wares.

Photo credit: Jean Pierre Vaillancourt
Photo credit: Jean Pierre Vaillancourt

Of course, a chic furniture collection merits equally sophisticated environs. Working within six lofty rooms in an 18th-century hotel particulier (conveniently, also shared with his atelier), the ELLE DECOR A-List designer and his studio created a progression of color-doused, residentially scaled vignettes that play up Yovanovitch’s aptitude for mixing history with the new.

“Creating this opportunity for clients to experience the textures, comfort and design of the new works in person was so important to us,” Yovanovitch told ELLE DECOR in an email. “So the showroom was all about setting the stage for people to fully enjoy themselves and encourage them to explore the pieces in an in-depth way.”

Photo credit: Jean Pierre Vaillancourt
Photo credit: Jean Pierre Vaillancourt

And while the interiors may be minimal, there is no shortage of drama. Yovanovitch worked with Atelier Mériguet-Carrère, a firm known for its meticulous restorations of historic interiors—Yves Saint Laurent and his partner, Pierre Bergé, were devoted clients—to develop all-new hues for each room, including vivid tangerine, dusty azure, and blush pink.

“I wanted each room to have a distinct feel to it—to really create a strong backdrop for the furniture and lighting and also show how versatile the works can be in a variety of contexts,” Yovanovitch explained.

To make the furnishings feel even more at home, each vignette features contemporary artwork from several venerable Paris galleries. A photograph of scattered planks by Tadashi Kawamata, for instance, cleverly references Yovanovitch’s oak-and-enamel Lovebirds dining table beneath it. Elsewhere, a Camille Henrot painting picks up the color overlaps in the Honeymoon wall sconce. But in the orange room, the references are entirely personal: a series of painted plates by Matthieu Cossé depict a lobster, sunbaked fields, and flowers—images from Yovanovitch’s childhood in Provence.

“There’s a rich history to the space, which I love,” the designer said, “and it ties in to my overall approach to interior design—reimagining historic spaces with contemporary elements.”

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