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Ohio MAGA Candidate Accidentally Sends Out Concession Email

Derek Myers reminded everyone on Tuesday why they should have “undo send” set up in their email. The MAGA House candidate’s campaign accidentally sent out a concession statement hours before polls closed in Ohio’s Republican primary election.

“Tonight did not go as we had hoped, but as we know, this race is decided in the primary. I want to give my congratulations to the Congressman-elect. I’m looking forward to uniting behind him and working with him to get President Trump re-elected to the White House and evicting Joe Biden,” the erroneous email read.

The premature announcement also contained estimates of how many people would be at Myers’ watch party, and a cooked-up quote from the congressional hopeful reassuring supporters that he’s only in his “thirties” and has a good “thirty-or-fifty more years left” to win a race.

Shortly after the email went out, his campaign sent another email blaming its accidental distribution on “a technical issue.”

“Attention Press: My campaign comms team has sent out an email in error as we prepare for both possible outcomes tonight,” Myers wrote on X (formerly Twitter). “The polls remain open until 7:30 p.m. Please disregard the email. Thank you.”

In a follow-up post, Myers added that “Two emails were prepared for this evening: one declaring a victory and one conceding the race. The concession email was sent in error as it was being loaded into the media distribution portal, as a draft, in the event of a loss. Accidentally, the ‘send now’ button was clicked instead of ‘draft.’”

It’s a reasonable (if embarrassing) explanation, but also one that contradicts his campaign’s claim of system glitch.

Myers added that “anyone who works in communications knows it’s not uncommon to have speeches and releases prepared in the event of each outcome, especially on such an important night. It’s simply good strategy.”

Anyone who works in communication will also tell you that in response to a major fuck up, you should probably coordinate your team’s response before going public.

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