NYC Mayor-elect Eric Adams to take oath in Times Square

·2-min read
Mayor-elect Eric Adams speaks at a news conference at the Queensbridge houses in Long Island City, Queens on Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2021, in New York. Adams named Keechant Sewell, a Long Island police chief, as the city's next police commissioner, making her the first woman to lead the nation’s largest police force. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

NEW YORK (AP) — Eric Adams, a former New York City police captain, will take his oath of office in the wee hours of New Year’s Day to become the second Black mayor of the nation’s most populous city.

New York's mayor-elect announced Wednesday that he would hold his swearing-in ceremony in Times Square on Saturday, shortly after the traditional midnight ball drop and amid thousands of New Year's Eve revelers.

“I am deeply humbled to officially take the oath of office at this iconic occasion, and to participate in the transfer of leadership that is a cornerstone of our democracy,” Adams said in a statement.

Adams will become the city's 110th mayor and helm a city of 8.8 million people who had been led for the past eight years by fellow Democrat Bill de Blasio.

The pandemic had cast uncertainty over his inauguration earlier this month, as infection rates surged.

He had hoped to hold his inauguration at Kings Theater in his home borough of Brooklyn, but scuttled those plans because of the quickly spreading omicron variant. In recent days, New York has posted record numbers of infections. A spokesperson said inauguration plans are still pending.

De Blasio took his first oath of office at his Brooklyn home a couple minutes after the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Day in 2014. It was followed later by a public ceremony on the steps of City Hall.

The choice of Times Square might be an unusual one, but not unprecedented.

Michael Bloomberg also took his oath of office in Times Square in the early minutes of 2002, a very public setting following the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. The symbolic event was a first for Times Square.

During the pandemic, Times Square became a worldwide symbol for the city's economic downturn, with businesses and the city's Theater District falling on hard times.

As tourism and businesses recover, it has become a symbol of the city's resiliency — which appears to not have been lost on the incoming mayor.

“Times Square has long been synonymous with the New Year — a place of excitement, renewal, and hope for the future,” Adams said. “These are the same themes that animated my campaign and will inform my mayoralty, as I prepare to lead the city out of this challenging period.”

Adams's ascendency to the mayor's office was assured this summer when he emerged from a crowded Democratic field — in a city where Democrats outnumber Republicans 7 to 1 — after striking a balance between his law enforcement career and his humble beginnings as the son of a single mother who cleaned houses and raised six children.

Adams will follow New York City’s only other Black mayor, David Dinkins, who held the office for a single term from 1990 until 1993.

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