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NBC News will drop Ronna McDaniel as a paid contributor after on-air outcry

Ronna McDaniel
Former Republican National Committee chair Ronna McDaniel.AP Photo/Alex Brandon
  • NBC News is dropping Ronna McDaniel as a contributor, per a memo.

  • McDaniel's hire had attracted a considerable amount of controversy at the network.

  • Critics pointed to McDaniel's previous support of former President Trump's 2020 election claims as a deal-breaker.

NBC News will drop former Republican National Committee chair Ronna McDaniel as a paid contributor after on-air criticism of the hiring from some of the network's top talent.

"No organization, particularly a newsroom, can succeed unless it is cohesive and aligned," NBCUniversal News Group chairman Cesar Conde wrote in a Tuesday memo obtained by Business Insider. "Over the last few days, it has become clear that this appointment undermines that goal."

"Our initial decision was made because of our deep commitment to presenting our audiences with a widely diverse set of viewpoints and experiences, particularly during these consequential times," he continued. "[W]e will redouble our efforts to seek voices that represent different parts of the political spectrum."

McDaniel prepared for her impending ouster by speaking with prospective attorneys ahead of a possible legal battle with NBC, a source familiar with the situation told CNN. She was also dropped by Creative Artists Agency, the talent agency that helped secure the initial deal between McDaniel and NBC, the outlet reported.

In recent days, the decision to hire McDaniel — who led the RNC from January 2017 until earlier this month — was panned in very public fashion by NBC News chief political analyst Chuck Todd, "Morning Joe" cohosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, MSNBC host Rachel Maddow, and others at the company.

Politico reported this week that the position was set to pay McDaniel roughly $300,000 per year — which raised internal ire among many at the network after NBC News underwent layoffs in January.

Read the original article on Business Insider