Myanmar's Suu Kyi in first court appearance

Suu Kyi looked in good health during a 30-minute meeting with her legal team, but said she had no access to newspapers during detention and was only partially aware of what was happening outside, her legal team head, Khin Maung Zaw, told Reuters.

The ousted leader, 75, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 for her efforts to build democracy, is among more than 4,000 people detained since the February 1 coup. She faces charges that range from illegally possessing walkie-talkie radios to violating a state secrets law, punishable by 14 years in prison.

Suu Kyi "wished people good health" in her meeting with her lawyers and also made a reference to her National League for Democracy (NLD) party that could be dissolved soon.

"Her party [grew] out of the people... the party may exist wherever the people [are]," Khin Maung Zaw quoted Suu Kyi as saying.

Myanmar has been in chaos since the army took power, with daily protests, marches and strikes nationwide against the junta. It has responded with lethal force, killing more than 800 people, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners activist group.

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