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Minister says pollster behind Anwar govt’s 100 days in office admitted methodology flawed, moots alternatives to gain public feedback

Malay Mail
Malay Mail

SHAH ALAM, March 5 — Communications and Digital minister Fahmi Fadzil today said he has met with social engagement centre O2 Malaysia, which ran a recent survey critical of the government after conducting a survey of its first 100 days in power.

He said he had questioned representatives of the company and found their methods of collecting data to be flawed.

“I asked them, if I bring a group of my supporters to fill up the Google form they used to collect the data, can I then ‘game’ the system? To which they said yes, that situation can happen.

“This admission in itself shows me that their methods were weak,” he told reporters after launching the MyDigital.KKD, a programme to raise digital awareness and literacy.

The O2 survey said about 71 per cent of Malay respondents in peninsular Malaysia were dissatisfied with the new government’s fulfilment of the 15th general election manifesto.

However it was published before March 4 when the government hit its 100 days and had a sample of 80 per cent male respondents.

Fahmi questioned the motive behind the survey which was conducted via five news organisations to commemorate the 100 days of Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim’s administration.

The survey had involved 35,077 respondents through five media outlets that published in English, Malay, Mandarin and Tamil: Sinar Harian, Awani, The Star, Sin Chew and Malaysia Nanban.

It had among others said that 71 per cent of Malay respondents in peninsular Malaysia were dissatisfied with the new government’s fulfilment of the 15th general election manifesto, and only 45 per cent of respondents felt the country was moving in the right direction.

A counter-survey released by consumer research technology company Vase.ai yesterday said just 23 per cent of its Malay respondents from peninsular Malaysia disapproved of Anwar Ibrahim as prime minister.

When asked his thoughts on today’s survey Fahmi said while he welcomed it, he still wants to know how it was done and its methodology.

“In the end I think the public aren’t too interested in numbers or surveys. It’s the rising cost of goods, giving good internet coverage and everything else that matters.

“I hope in future events I can have the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission open booths so people can either get help or can drop their complaints so we can sort it out,” he said.