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London weather: Capital set for strong winds and heavy rain in run-up to Easter bank holiday

Londoners are being warned to expect strong winds and heavy, blustery showers in the run-up to Easter, with some areas across the country at risk of flooding.

The Met Office has warned of “unsettled” conditions throughout the week, with strong winds and heavy downpours brought on by low pressure.

In London, the Met Office has predicted “strong winds” and “heavy blustery showers” between Wednesday and the start of the Easter bank holiday.

Temperatures are expected to be below average and feel especially chilly in the wind, with highs of around 11 degrees.

The rest of the country is also expected to witness unsettled weather, with experts “monitoring” areas which are prone to flooding, said Met Office meteorologist Tom Morgan.

He said: “The winter has left some land quite saturated. We may have to issue a rainfall warning in the south-western areas of England, but we will continue to monitor this.

“If necessary, it would be up to the Environment Agency to issue a flood warning.”

Mr Morgan also urged holidaymakers looking to get away for Easter to “keep an eye” on the weather.

He said: “It’s a disappointing forecast for people hoping to go on a staycation, but these conditions are likely to lift as the low pressure starts to move away.

“This means we could start to see highs of 15C or 16C as we move into and past the weekend.

So, it’s not all doom and gloom.”

Met Office deputy chief meteorologist Mark Sidaway said: “It’s another very unsettled week for much of the UK, with heavy, blustery showers, longer spells of rain and also some strong winds.

“In terms of hazards in the current forecast, we’re continuing to keep an eye on some of the expected rainfall totals as they build up through the week, with some places in the south still quite sensitive to rainfall amounts due to the wet winter many have experienced.

“We will also need to monitor the winds with the potential for gales to develop around some coastal areas of the north at first, then later some south-western areas, especially as these may coincide with some high tides.”

The conditions follow one of the wettest winters seen in the UK but the warmest February on record for England and Wales.

Despite this damp weather, the UK can look forward to more daylight in the evenings after the clocks go forward one hour at 1am on Easter Sunday, March 31.