King Charles booed by anti-monarchy protesters during visit to Wales

·Breaking News Editor, Yahoo News UK
·4-min read
Anti-Royalists demonstrate ahead of a visit by the King and Queen Consort, to Cardiff Castle, in south Wales on September 16, 2022. - King Charles III heads to Wales for the last of his visits to the four nations of the United Kingdom as preparations for the queen's state funeral gather pace. (Photo by ADRIAN DENNIS / AFP) (Photo by ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images)
Anti-Royalists demonstrate ahead of a visit by the King and Queen Consort, to Cardiff Castle. (Getty)

King Charles has been greeted with boos by a small crowd of protesters during his first visit to Wales as monarch.

Campaigners held banners and posters outside the Welsh Parliament as the King and new Queen Consort left on Friday afternoon.

Banners had slogans which said: "Abolish the monarchy", "Citizen not subject", and "Democracy now."

Footage posted on social media showed people booing the couple as they made their way through crowds, although much of the noice was drowned out by cheers from royal supporters.

The King and Queen Consort are visiting Cardiff for what will be seen by many as a historical day for Wales.

However, for many others, the day is significant for another reason – it is Owain Glyndwr Day.

A small protest is seen as King Charles III and the Queen Consort arrive at Cardiff Castle in Wales. Picture date: Friday September 16, 2022.
A small protest is seen as King Charles III and the Queen Consort arrive at Cardiff Castle in Wales. Picture date: Friday September 16, 2022.
King Charles III and the Queen Consort arriving at Cardiff Castle in Wales. Picture date: Friday September 16, 2022.
King Charles III and the Queen Consort arriving at Cardiff Castle in Wales. (PA)

Glyndwr Day is the anniversary of the beginning of the 15-year uprising in 1400 against Henry IV led by the "rebel" Prince of Wales.

The revolt is considered to be the last Welsh war of independence and Glyndwr has since been viewed as a figurehead of Welsh nationalism and the independence movement.

Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, a number of Glyndwr Day events were cancelled, prompting disappointment and anger in some communities.

But as Charles and Camilla are led on a procession through the Welsh capital the issue of protests has become a key touchstone following the Queen's death on Thursday.

King Charles III (centre) meets members of the public as he leaves the Senedd in Cardiff, Wales, after a visit to receive a Motion of Condolence following the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Picture date: Friday September 16, 2022.
King Charles III (centre) meets members of the public as he leaves the Senedd . (PA)

Who was Owain Glyndwr?

Owain Glyndwr was the last native Welshman to hold the Prince of Wales title.

He was born in around 1354 in Sycharth Castle, Llansilin, Powys. Of aristocratic stock, he was educated partly in England and returned home to Wales to marry.

Towards the end of the 14th century, there was growing discontent between the Welsh and the English Crown and Parliament over land disputes.

On September 16 1400, Glyndwr, who was 50, mobilised a militia of several hundred men in Ruthin and attacked a number of towns in the north-east of the country.

Seasoned Welsh soldiers and archers who had fought in Europe for the English monarch left the king’s service and also joined the uprising.

The response was severe, with Henry IV marching an army across north Wales and bringing in anti-Welsh legislation, including outlawing Welsh-language performers and singers.

But, by the end of 1403, Glyndwr controlled most of Wales.

He assembled a parliament at Machynlleth in 1404 and was crowned king of a free Wales.

However, from 1408 the tide turned against Glyndwr, beginning with the fall of Aberystwyth and Harlech castles.

His family was taken hostage and he was ruled an outlaw.

Glyndwr went into hiding but was never betrayed and, despite being offered a pardon by Henry V, he never came forward and is believed to have died some time in 1416.

Prince of Wales title

The title Prince of Wales, as it is used today, was originally created by Edward I in 1301 after his conquest of Wales. It was a political statement made to emphasise the subjugation of the Welsh by the English monarch and has therefore been seen by some as a symbol of oppression.

Queen Elizabeth II announced her son Charles would be Prince of Wales when he was nine.

His investiture was held in 1969 at Caernarfon Castle, though protests were planned to coincide with the ceremony.

Many demonstrations were peaceful, but more direct action was taken by paramilitary groups including Mudiad Amddiffyn Cymru (MAC), which plotted to place bombs outside government buildings to explode on the day.

His most recent trip to Wales with Camilla saw thousands turn out on the streets of Treorchy, in the Rhondda Valley, to greet them.

His decision to name his son William as Prince of Wales in his first speech as King last Friday, however, came as a surprise to many.

A petition calling for an end to the title out of “respect” for the Welsh has since gathered more than 25,000 signatures.

In a statement following the announcement, the new Prince and Princess of Wales spoke of their “deep affection” for Wales, having made their first family home in Anglesey.

They promised to carry out the role with “humility and great respect”.