Advertisement

HBA Raises Concerns Over Sharing Of Home Buyers Data, Transform Rundown PPR Flats Into High-Rise Affordable Housing Projects And, More

HBA Raises Concerns Over Sharing Of Home Buyers Data, Transform Rundown PPR Flats Into High-Rise Affordable Housing Projects And, More
HBA Raises Concerns Over Sharing Of Home Buyers Data, Transform Rundown PPR Flats Into High-Rise Affordable Housing Projects And, More

19th March – 25th March

The National House Buyers Association (HBA) expressed concern over the sharing of home buyers data from the Housing Integrated Management System (HIMS) among five government agencies.

Meanwhile, Finn Chong, former president of Master Builders Association, urged the government to replace low-density public housing project (PPR) flats with more affordable homes.

 

1. HBA raises concerns over sharing of home buyers data

The National House Buyers Association (HBA) expressed concern over the sharing of home buyers data from the Housing Integrated Management System (HIMS) among five government agencies.

Launched in January 2022, the government run HIMS – which requires extensive personal data from home buyers – is used by developers in acquiring licenses, sales permits, advertising permits and monitoring projects, reported Free Malaysia Today.

“HBA shared its concern over how personal information, details and data of house buyers are filled in and uploaded on HIMS. HBA is doubtful of the safety and security of the data stored in the system,” said a Bar Council circular.

Datuk Chang Kim Loong, HBA’s Honorary Secretary-General, underscored the potential risk of breaches as well as legal complications if the information is shared, exposed or sold to third parties.

Meanwhile, the Bar Council is worried over the lawyers inability to access HIMS, hindering their involvement in the housing sector.

“The legal profession plays a crucial role in navigating the complexities of HIMS and ensuring seamless conveyancing processes, particularly in assisting potential buyers,” it said.

 

2. Transform rundown PPR flats into high-rise affordable housing projects

Finn Chong, former president of Master Builders Association, urged the government to replace low-density public housing project (PPR) flats with more affordable homes.

He believes that doing so would save on land acquisition costs as well as rejuvenate urban areas, especially densely populated regions such as Kuala Lumpur and Penang, reported Free Malaysia Today.

He pointed that Penang has a significant amount of underutilised land at around one-third of the state.

“These older, low-rise (PPR) buildings can be transformed into taller structures, allowing for more efficient use of land,” said Choong.

He noted that this strategy is aligned with the government’s plan to raise the supply of low-cost housing via Program Residensi Rakyat (PRR), with unit prices set to be capped at RM60,000 each.

Choong underscored the importance of effectively managing land costs and suggested providing further incentives to developers who undertake these projects.

 

3. Selangor’s property market benefits from lower residential overhang

Residential buildings with dollar prices and calculator. Property valuation. Housing value. Investment business plan. Market study. Calculating mortgage. Prices comparison for renting apartments.
Residential buildings with dollar prices and calculator. Property valuation. Housing value. Investment business plan. Market study. Calculating mortgage. Prices comparison for renting apartments.

Selangor’s real estate industry is experiencing a positive turn as residential overhang continues to decline, easing concerns on oversupply of residential properties, said MIDF Research.

National Property Information Centre (NAPIC) data showed that Selangor’s house price index (HPI) increased to 224.2 during the third quarter of 2023, from Q2 2023’s 220.5 and Q3 2022’s 218.0.

The hike reflects a broader uptrend in Malaysia following the reopening of the economy.

Selangor’s residential overhang dropped to 4,228 units in Q4 2023 from Q3 2023’s 4,500 units and Q4 2022’s 5,258 units.

“Overall, we see that the outlook for the property sector in Selangor is stable and positive, supported by the stable house price outlook and easing concern about residential oversupply,” said MIDF Research.

Notably, the research house has kept a “positive” outlook on Malaysia’s real estate sector as it expects the sector’s recovery to continue to drive new sales as well as earnings for developers.

 

4. Pan Borneo Highway delay in Sabah due to land acquisition issues

Delays in the construction of the Pan Borneo Highway (LPB) in Sabah are due to land acquisition issues and changes in project implementation methods, said Works Minister Datuk Seri Alexander Nanta Linggi.

He noted that unlike Sarawak’s LPB project, which started in 2015, Sabah’s project commenced in 2016, reported Bernama.

Moreover, only a portion of the 35 work packages proceeded with construction, while Phase 1B had to be reassessed due to changes in implementation methods and will only start this year.

“At the same time, just like other government projects, the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted the progress and construction costs of the Pan Borneo Highway project in Sabah. However, the government remains committed to ensuring the smoothness and sustainability of the project,” shared the minister.

To enhance progress, a project management consultant (PMC) was appointed to help Sabah Public Works Department (JKR) expedite the project via various mitigation plans such as rescheduled construction timelines and extensions of times for contractors.

The procurement process for the remaining 19 work packages of Phase 1B is expected to be finalised in Q2 2024, marking the completion of Sabah’s Pan Borneo Highway project Phase 1.

 

5. Residents’ association urges government to halt condo project

The Taman P Ramlee Residents’ Association (TPRA) in Setapak, Kuala Lumpur is once again appealing to the government to halt a proposed condominium project due to concerns over increased traffic congestion.

This comes after Wangsa Maju MP Zahid Hassan informed them that the plan to construct two 48-storey towers with 840 condominium units would proceed, reported Free Malaysia Today.

In July 2023, the association has appealed to Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim to review the proposed project and urged the Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) to engage with residents and Zahid. However, they did not receive a response.

TPRA question DBKL’s decision to depart from the 4.0:1 gazetted plot ratio under the Kuala Lumpur City Plan and increase the ratio to 6.5:1.

They pointed that the proposed project site is not an underdeveloped land. In fact, it is a busy area with 29 existing condominium buildings and low-cost apartments.

TPRA president KK Tai revealed that the residents only want DBKL and the developer to adhere to the KL Local Plan 2020, which the residents had taken part in drafting.

“But what’s the point if DBKL can arbitrarily go against a gazetted plot ratio on a vague definition of rejuvenation?” Tai said.