Eleanor Roosevelt’s Former Townhouse on the Upper East Side Is on the Market for $13,490,000—See Inside

·1-min read
Photo credit: Evan Joseph Images/Compass
Photo credit: Evan Joseph Images/Compass

This story was originally published on 2/24/2020; it has been updated to reflect new information.

If you've ever wanted to live like a First Lady, now is your chance, as Eleanor Roosevelt’s onetime residence on the Upper East Side is on the market, for $13,490,000.

Located at 55 East 74th Street, this five-story townhouse was built in 1910 and boasts six bedrooms, five full baths, and two half baths, across 8,500 square feet. Eleanor Roosevelt lived here from 1959 until her death in 1962.

Photo credit: Evan Joseph Images/Compass
Photo credit: Evan Joseph Images/Compass

This historic home first hit the market in November of 2018 and is currently listed for $13,490,000. Its architecture was designed in 1898, by Buchman and Deisler, and its interiors were recently staged by Quadra.

On the exterior of the limestone townhouse is a plaque that reads, “The First Lady of the United States (1933-1945), a political activist known for her unwavering commitment to human rights issues, lived here from 1959 to 1962. While a delegate to the United Nations (1946-1952), she chaired the commission that drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948).”

Photo credit: Evan Joseph Images/Compass
Photo credit: Evan Joseph Images/Compass

Amenities of the property include a rooftop garden, an elevator with access to all floors of the home, and imposing 12-foot ceilings. Notable people who were once guests here include President John F. Kennedy and composer Leonard Bernstein.

Interested in buying a piece of American history? You can take a look at the listing here, which is offered by Benjamin Glazer of Compass.

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