Digital nomads wooed by Greece

Imagine working from home... on a Greek island.

Well, it's becoming a reality for a growing number of workers from across the globe, as Greece has become an unlikely hub for so-called digital nomads.

Communications consultant Rowena Harding is one of them.

''We can spend a lot more time in the outdoors here, like the quality of the air and the sea is really quite lovely so the environment plays a really big part in how much you enjoy your day to day work."

From her garden on Aegina island, Harding works with governments and charities across the globe.

The push to attract a community of remote workers is among the green and digital reforms Greece hopes will help revive its economy and restore its international image after more than a decade of crisis.

Greece is also planning visas and offering a 50% income tax cut for seven years for professionals who move there.

25-year old Stefanos Bournias was born in Greece but raised in Bali.

He moved from Amsterdam to Athens last March, working for a startup.

He had previously been put off by the lack of opportunities, working conditions and wages in Greece.

And as a foreign resident, he waded through "layers and layers of red tape" on things like opening a bank account.

Although he says there's a high quality of life, his future in Greece is uncertain.

"I don't know how long I'll stay in Greece, right now it's working for me, I'm really enjoying being here and I'm looking forward to things opening up to actual start to get to meet people and set up my social life more but I guess I'll probably be leaving at some point in time."

Last month, the government outlined a multi-billion dollar plan dubbed "Greece 2.0" including investments in 5G, to reinforce its attractiveness as a work location.

Eager to compete with Portugal's Madeira island, which set up a digital nomad village, the Greek isles of Rhodes and Crete are also promoting and launching projects.