Is this cliffside office the ultimate in remote working?

Is this cliffside office the ultimate in remote working?

Location: Anglesey, Wales

Jason Griffin is a call center consultant turned ‘digital nomad.’

It's a term used to described people who use technology to work from wherever there's connectivity.

And the trend is becoming more popular, as the ongoing health crisis continues to change our working habits.

"Today, we are pushing the technology to its limits because we are going over a cliff face, abseiling down to a ledge and I will be working all day from that ledge and taking and making calls, interacting with internal staff while I sit there at this ledge on the side of a cliff, just showing that remote literally means remote."

Griffin says as long as he has a mobile connection and his laptop,

he can do his job as good as - if not better - than if he were in a busy office.

"The traditional five days in the office, Monday, Friday, 9 to 5 – they're gone, they are not here anymore. People are going to be split between home and office, if not home all the time. And it's exciting because it fits people's life so much better. Everything is going to be better."

But even if you’re not planning on dangling off the side of a cliff over the Irish Sea,

you may find yourself being wooed by the idea of packing up and setting up camp on say…a Greek island

Communications consultant Rowena Harding likes to take a walk by the sea before work,

then opens up her laptop in the sun and starts her day.

"My favorite thing about being a digital nomad on a Greek island is that I can get to the sea so quickly, I can walk here in 10 minutes, even if I don't know what I want to do. If I'm really stressed out from something I just go, 'take the rubbish' out and the rubbish bins are just over there and it means I get to walk to the sea and it just lifts my soul so much."

Soon – her working set up may not be uncommon.

A survey from U.S.-based Enterprise Technology Research predicts

the percentage of workers globally permanently working from home is expected to double in 2021.

In Britain, more employers say working from home is increasing the productivity of their staff, according to a survey by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

Ade McCormack is a digital strategist and author of "Beyond 9 to 5: Your career guide for the digital age."

"The untethered workforce would appear to be the way forward. The big problem that the major players have is that they believe that the best work can be done when the people are bundled together in the one office, so to speak. So there's going to be a little bit of a tension there. But again, as the war for talent becomes increasingly acute, it will be the talent that determines the conditions of work and not the employer. So I see that's going to be one of the major post-industrial era shifts. //The new way of working is going to be completely different going forward. That's how I see it. The traditional five days in the office, Monday, Friday, 9 to 5; they're gone, they are not here anymore. People are going to be split between home and office, if not home all the time. And it's exciting because it fits people's life so much better. Everything is going to be better."