Australian music group The Wiggles responds to criticisms after culturally insensitive song on ‘Papadum’ resurface (VIDEO)

Anne Grace Savitha
·2-min read
The Wiggles' Papadum has been criticised by many people for being culturally insensitive. —Screengrab via Twitter/PranPatel
The Wiggles' Papadum has been criticised by many people for being culturally insensitive. —Screengrab via Twitter/PranPatel

PETALING JAYA, October 26 — Australian children’s music group The Wiggles founder Anthony Field has apologised over an old video of the group’s Papadum song.

The music video originally shown in 2014 features singers donning traditional Indian attire and holding the thin flatbread in various positions and repeatedly singing Papadum throughout the song.

The presence of an Indian actress in the video, just holding the thin flatbread while smiling too, left many upset.

The music video has sparked criticisms from many for the culturally insensitive song and its lack of proper content on the Indian thin flatbread.

Field told Metro that he wrote the song and directed the clip on Pappadum song in 2014 which was meant as a celebration.

“It was not my intention to be culturally insensitive to the Indian community or to add value to ethnic stereotyping. Apologies,” he said.

A Twitter user sarcastically remarked that the Indian woman appeared to smile awkwardly while holding a papadum while the other cast members were singing.

Another commented that the song was absolutely disturbing and disgusting that it was even allowed in the first place.

Lalita Pulavarti meanwhile said that the song lacked educational depth for children because of its lack of representation in terms of its actors and meaning of the Indian delectable snack papadum.

The Papadum song which was released in 2014 was featured in an episode of Wiggles television show Ready, Steady, Wiggle! called Lachy’s Pappadum Party.

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