Astroworld Festival Victims File 100-Plus Lawsuits Against Travis Scott, Live Nation

·2-min read

More than 100 lawsuits are being filed on behalf of victims of Travis Scott’s Astroworld music festival tragedy that killed nine people, attorneys said Friday.

Ben Crump and Alex Hilliard announced the filings of the suits again Scott and promoter Live Nation at a news conference in Houston.

The lawsuits follow a crowd surge during Scott’s headlining performance at Houston’s NRG Park that caused a panic and left some people trampled or with cardiac arrest. More than 300 people were treated at a field hospital and eight people died during the festival. A ninth victim died of her injuries on Wednesday. Over 50,000 people attended the event.

Bharti Shahani, a 22-year-old senior at Texas A&M University, succumbed to injuries at Houston Methodist Hospital on Wednesday night. Shahani, who suffered multiple heart attacks during the crowd surge, was placed on a ventilator with no brain activity shortly after arriving at the hospital, reported by abc13.com.

The first lawsuit in the Astroworld tragedy, which was obtained by TheWrap, was filed by Houston resident Manuel Souza and accuses Scott and the organizers of gross negligence. According to the lawsuit, Souza was one of the dozens of Astroworld attendees who was trampled by the crowd as security barriers were breached by people attempting to enter the music festival during the early hours of the event.

Scott has said he will offer refunds all attendees of the concert and will no longer perform at the Day N Vegas festival scheduled for this weekend, Nov. 12-14 at the Las Vegas Fest. Scott was originally set as the headliner on Saturday, Nov. 13. The festival, like Astroworld, is a general admission event, and is also set to include performances by Lil Baby, Doja Cat and Saweetie.

Pamela Chelin contributed to this report.

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