Argentine town seeks to curb its capybara population

These capybaras don't get along with their neighbors in this wealthy suburb of Buenos Aires

The animals are known as "carpinchos" in Argentina

They're the largest rodents in the world and are herbivorous, semi-aquatic animals

SPOKESPERSON FOR NORDELTA NEIGHBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION, MARCELO CANTON, SAYING:

"For those who have a garden by the water, many times the capybaras enter the garden and there might be a risk for pets who face off with them like like dogs. There is no risk to humans, but capybaras will eat garden plants. This has provoked anger from some neighbours who are demanding quick and urgent measures to control the capybaras. That is not a solution for today."

Residents are concerned about the rapid growth of the population

MARCELO CANTON, SAYING:

"The number of capybaras has increased rapidly. Each female has two fertilisation periods per year and can have up to seven offspring. Each female can have 15 offspring per year."

Nordelta sits on a wetland and is home to many species

MARCELO CANTON, SAYING:

"We want the capybaras to keep living here. We live well with them, we like them but we don't think there is enough space for them. So we need to stop an increase in the population."

According to surveys, there are about 400 capybaras among the population of 40,000 people

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