AG Kalidas elected as new Malaysian Bar president

Yiswaree Palansamy
·1-min read
Newly elected Malaysian Bar president AG Kalidas speaks during a press conference at Malaysia Bar council building March 13,2021. — Picture by Ahmad Zamzahuri
Newly elected Malaysian Bar president AG Kalidas speaks during a press conference at Malaysia Bar council building March 13,2021. — Picture by Ahmad Zamzahuri

KUALA LUMPUR, March 13 — AG Kalidas has been elected as the new Malaysian Bar president for the 2021/2022 term, after the organisation's annual general meeting (AGM) today.

Kalidas was formerly the secretary of the lawyers’ body.

Surindar Singh Chain Singh meanwhile, was elected as the body’s vice-president for the second term.

Shahareen Begun Abdul Subhan was made the Malaysian Bar secretary, while Murshidah Mustafa was elected as the treasurer in the Malaysian Bar’s 75th AGM.

In a press conference after the AGM, Kalidas said that he has an arduous task ahead of him in championing many causes.

“As a newly elected president, I have a difficult task ahead of me, in dealing with issues both in the Bar and matters of public importance and rule of law.

“Bar Council reiterates our reservations on the necessity of the Proclamation of Emergency and related Ordinances, in light of other existing and specific legislations to manage the pandemic,” he said, adding that the body would also continue to raise concerns on issues of fundamental rights and national justice.

Kalidas also called on the Cabinet to advice the Yang di-Pertuan Agong to hold digital parliamentary meetings as practised in other nations.

He also called on the government to enact laws which protect and strengthen the rights of vulnerable and marginalised groups and establish a law reform Commission which the Malaysian Bar had been advocating for.

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