Adorable rescued jaguars show affection to each other

These beautiful female jaguars were rescued from the black market when they were just cubs, so they had to be raised at a Wildlife Refuge, and won't be able to be released back into the wild, unfortunately. They aren't sisters, but they grew up together and still share the same enclosure, so they have formed a strong bond, and one loves to show affection to the other! The illegal wildlife trade is the third most valuable illicit commerce in the world, losing only to drugs and weapons. That, along with loss of habitat by deforestation, fires, etc., results in an enormous amount of animals in need of rescuing. Only 1 in 10 animals survive trafficking! Do not support the pet trade! Animals should be free! The Jaguar (Panthera onca) is the largest cat species in the American continent and the third-largest in the world. It shares the Panthera genus with four other big cats: the Lion (Panthera leo), the Tiger (Panthera tigris), the Leopard (Panthera pardus), and the Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia). It has a stocky body and short, thick and powerful limbs, making the jaguar a great climber and swimmer. The proportionally bigger head grants it an extremely powerful jaw, being able to bite through any prey and drag it. Although the jaguar is often confused with the leopard, it is considerably sturdier and heavier than its African cousin, and it has a rounder head. The rosettes are also different, being larger, sometimes darker, and fewer in number; the contours are thicker and there is a small spot in the center. Each animal has a unique coat pattern, like fingerprints. The head and neck generally have solid spots instead of rosettes; and the same happens on the tail, where they may merge and form a ring. Females are usually 10 to 20% smaller than males, but the smallest male recorded weighed only 36 Kg, and the largest male 158 Kg. Sizes vary according to regions and habitats. The largest jaguars occur in open flood plains areas, in Venezuela and Brazil, and the smallest jaguars are found in the dense forests of Central America.

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