4 families sue US over Navy fuel-tainted Hawaii tap water

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FILE - In this photo provided by the U.S. Navy, Rear Adm. John Korka, Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command (NAVFAC), and Chief of Civil Engineers, leads Navy and civilian water quality recovery experts through the tunnels of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility, near Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 23, 2021. The U.S. Navy "harbored toxic secrets" when jet fuel contaminated drinking water for 93,000 military members and civilians in Hawaii, four families said in a lawsuit filed Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2022, claiming they continue to suffer maladies such as seizures, gastrointestinal disorders and neurological issues. (Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Luke McCall/U.S. Navy via AP, File) (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

HONOLULU (AP) — The U.S. Navy “harbored toxic secrets” when jet fuel contaminated drinking water for 93,000 military members and civilians in Hawaii, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday from four families who say they're still suffering from seizures, gastrointestinal disorders and neurological issues.

Hundreds of additional claims are expected from those who ingested the toxic water, said the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Honolulu. Others going through the administrative process of the Federal Tort Claims Act will be added to the lawsuit.

At least twice last year, thousands of gallons of jet fuel from the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility, a massive World War II-era military-run tank farm in the hills above Pearl Harbor, leaked into a well that supplied water to homes and offices in and around the sprawling base.

A Navy investigation blamed the water crisis on shoddy management and human error.

“Because government personnel then failed to disclose those leaks as required, the plaintiffs continued to ingest jet fuel and became sick from that exposure," the lawsuit said. "Instead of promptly and appropriately addressing the harm, government officials conducted a woefully inadequate clean-up and clearing effort, while government doctors provided medical care far below the standard of care.”

The Navy said in a statement it doesn't comment on ongoing litigation. “The Navy’s priorities are to ensure the safety and health of our people, their families, and the community members impacted by the Red Hill fuel spill, provide responses to their concerns, and ensure access to clean drinking water,” the statement said.

Each family lived in a home at or near Pearl Harbor with water provided by the Navy. The families include a mother who is a major in the Army, a father who is an active-duty Navy ensign, a father who is a senior chief petty officer in the Navy and a father who is an active-duty technical sergeant in the Air Force, according to the lawsuit.

The families have since left Hawaii.

They are asking for monetary awards to be determined at trial for damages including pain and suffering, mental anguish and medical expenses.