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2nd round of rotating strikes for Sask. teachers to begin Wednesday

On Wednesday, about 4,300 teachers will be involved in the rotating strikes, and the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation estimates about 65,000 students will be affected. (Liam O'Connor/CBC - image credit)
On Wednesday, about 4,300 teachers will be involved in the rotating strikes, and the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation estimates about 65,000 students will be affected. (Liam O'Connor/CBC - image credit)

The Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation has announced its latest round of job action amid the ongoing bargaining impasse with the provincial government.

The federation gave 48 hours of notice for strikes that will begin in various provincial communities starting Wednesday, it said in a Sunday news release.

About 4,300 teachers will be involved in the strike, with approximately 65,300 students will be affected, according the release.

"[The] government thinks they can wait us out, but they have failed to account for the most important factors," federation president Samantha Becotte said in the release.

"Teachers are fed up and are united."

The following teachers' local associations will be taking strike action on Wednesday:

  • Creighton Teachers' Association, including Creighton School Division.

  • Northern Area Teachers' Association, including Northern Lights School Division.

  • Prairie Spirit School Division, including Prairie Spirit School Division.

  • Saskatoon Teachers' Association, including Greater Saskatoon Catholic Schools and Saskatoon Public Schools.

The rotating strike also includes Conseil des écoles fransaskoises schools and Saskatchewan Distance Learning teachers.

Teachers have already taken job action three times since the current contract dispute started, including two province-wide one-day walk outs, and rotating full-day strikes.

The teachers' union and government both claim the other side is holding up negotiations.

The federation says the province is refusing to bargain on class size and complexity, but the government maintains the true issue is over salary proposals.

Teachers want a two percent annual wage increase, and also to account for inflation they want their salaries to be tied to the Consumer Price Index.

The province says the index isn't a part of other collective agreements, and they are offering a seven per-cent raise over three years.