104 applications received for vaccine injury financial aid scheme: Gan Kim Yong

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Health Minister and Multi-Ministry Taskforce co-chair Gan Kim Yong delivering his Ministerial Statement in Parliament on Tuesday (11 May). (PHOTO: YouTube screengrab)
Health Minister and Multi-Ministry Taskforce co-chair Gan Kim Yong delivering his Ministerial Statement in Parliament on Tuesday (11 May). (PHOTO: YouTube screengrab)

SINGAPORE — The Vaccine Injury Financial Assistance Programme (VIFAP) has received 104 applications as of 3 May, said Health Minister and Multi-Ministry Taskforce co-chair Gan Kim Yong in Parliament on Tuesday (11 May).

Of these applications, 75 have been reviewed while 45 have been rejected. Of those being reviewed, 30 applications were assessed to have met the VIFAP qualifying criteria, said Gan while delivering a Ministerial Statement.

The qualifying applications include 21 cases of allergic reactions, four neurology-related cases, three cardiology-related cases as well as one haematology and dermatology-related case each, he added. The remaining 29 applications are still awaiting review.

VIFAP provides one-time goodwill financial assistance to those who experience serious side-effects linked to the COVID-19 vaccines administered in Singapore. Applications are open to citizens, permanent residents and long-term pass holders who have received their vaccination here.

According to the Ministry of Health, a serious side-effect is defined as one that is "potentially life-threatening or fatal, and has required inpatient hospitalisation or has caused persistent incapacity or disability".

In his speech, Gan also noted that, as of 18 April, the Health Sciences Authority (HSA) has received 2,796 reports of suspected adverse events related to vaccines administered in Singapore.

He added that the figure represents just 0.13 per cent of the vaccine doses given here and that the majority of these cases were non-serious adverse events. Overall, just 0.004 per cent of the doses administered led to reports of serious adverse events.

Gan said that the most commonly reported adverse events were dizziness, fever, muscle ache, pain at the injection site, headache and allergic reactions – symptoms that generally resolved themselves within a few days.

"We've also not seen any local cases of unusual blood clots associated with low platelets that have been reported with other vaccines used overseas," said Gan.

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